Stargate Monuments

marthawells

Martha Wells

The Invisible Woman


Stargate Monuments
marthawells

Guide Post

This is a brief introduction post for this journal.Collapse )

I also post at Tumblr, Twitter, and Dreamwidth.

Leia
marthawells

Fanfiction and Me

This is a link to an article I wrote for Black Gate on how I found fanfic and early Star Wars fanzines: Fanfiction and Me: http://www.blackgate.com/2014/10/22/fanfiction-and-me/

The editor's young daughter is very much into fanfiction and he was getting tired of seeing negative articles about it.

Excerpt: I was introduced to fanfiction after The Empire Strikes Back came out in 1980, when I was around fifteen. This was long before the internet, and fanfic was printed in fanzines, fan-produced magazines that were mimeographed or xeroxed, or if the editor could afford it, offset printed. But finding them, if you didn’t already know someone who knew about them, was nearly impossible.

As a lonely, feral, anxiety-ridden, teenage fan, my only connection to the fandom world at all was Starlog magazine. Back then, Starlog was a lifeline for me, and it not only featured articles and news about TV shows, movies, and books, but also fan groups and conventions. (I chose the university I went to because Starlog had an article that mentioned its student SF/F club and convention, but that’s another story.)

The magazine also had a section of small cheap personal ads in the back for fan-related merchandise. One issue a fanzine called Facets, dedicated to fanfic about Harrison Ford’s various characters (mostly Han Solo and Indiana Jones) bought an ad, and I sent my money in (I don’t remember how much, probably less than $10) and bought a couple of small fanzines.

I was hooked. The back of each fanzine was filled with ads and flyers for other Star Wars fanzines, and I dived in and ordered more.

Raksura
marthawells

Question Answer, Appearances

Sorry for the delay in answering! One of our goddaughters came to visit this weekend and we went to a great wedding. It was very fannish, with table centerpieces from all different fandoms (we sat at the Stargate table) and lots of delicious food. I think they said the bride made the curry, which went really well on top of the barbequed brisket.

Yesterday was also my 19th wedding anniversary, so we went out to dinner and had way too much food. There has been wacky publishing news I can't really talk about yet, though some of it (dealing with the Strange Chemistry/Angry Robot disaster) is mostly not good. I am really looking forward to being able to show off the cover of the next Raksura collection, because the sketch was looking pretty gorgeous. I'm also going to be involved in a couple of kickstarters that are coming up.


kalinara asked I've been rereading the Raksura books (which are lovely) but I'm finding myself confused a bit about how Raksura age. I had gotten the impression that Jade and Moon were fairly young for Raksura. However, I remember reading that Tempest was (or appeared to be) about the same age as Jade, and she already has an adult child. On the other hand, characters like Lithe and Shade still seem very young.

I was hoping you might clarify: how long do Raksura remain fledglings? Approximately what age do Raksura reach adulthood?


Thank you!

Aeriat Raksura basically have a long period of adolescence, even after they leave the nurseries. The Arbora do as well, but it doesn't last quite as long. Once Raksura reach adulthood, they don't change physically or show signs of aging until they get into what would be the equivalent for a human of their late 60s, early 70s, when they start to lose the pigmentation in their skin/scales. So Tempest looks about Jade's age, but is older. (You also have to remember the descriptions are from Moon's perspective and there's a lot he doesn't know or realize yet.) Lithe and Shade are both younger than Moon, but have also been sheltered quite a bit in Opal Night. (Because of Moon's experiences, most if not all of the Raksura his age that he meets are going to seem younger, just because they've spent their lives protected by a court.)

Moon's been alive about forty turns, but as far as Raksuran aging/maturity levels go, this would be the equivalent of being in his early twenties.

I hope that makes sense!

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Upcoming signings

* I'm doing a signing Saturday November 8, 2014, at 1:00 pm for Stories of the Raksura Volume I and the paperback edition of Star Wars: Razor's Edge at Murder by the Book, in Houston, Texas.

If you can't be there, you can use this page to order a signed book from the store. They can also order The Cloud Roads, The Serpent Sea, and The Siren Depths from them to be signed and shipped to you also, so if you wanted a signed set of all the books, say as a Christmas or other winter holiday present, this would be a good time to do it.

* I'l also be doing a signing for Blade Singer with Aaron de Orive, at the Barnes & Noble Arboretum in Austin, Texas, on Saturday November 15 at 2:00. Hopefully they'll have some of my other books, too.

* On February 13-15, 2015, I'll be a panelist at ConDFW in Dallas, TX. This is one of my favorite cons, so if you're nearby, check it out.

Forest -Kashyyk
marthawells

Another Question Answer

thanate asked Did you mean for there to be a bit of a family resemblance between Kade and Flower?

I don't think I intended that, but yeah, there is a bit, isn't there? One of the things I wanted to do with Flower is that the things Moon assumes are just part of her normal appearance are actually signs of advanced age, but he doesn't realize it because they're different from Stone's signs of advanced age.



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PSA:

One thing you can do to actually help the ebola epidemic is donate to Oxfam America or Oxfam International to send water, equipment, and other supplies to medical teams in Sierra Leone, Liberia, etc.

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Still Taking Questions

If anyone has a question, a general question about publishing (how it works, agents, etc), or a question about my writing, or my books, or cats, or anything else I've been doing, ask in this post and I'll try to answer it.

John and Teyla - Uh Oh
marthawells

First Two Question Answers

It's a depression and sinus headache day, so let's do questions!


Here's the first two question answers from the previous post:

* nthngtoseehere asked I am re-(re-re-re-re-re-re-)listening to the books on audio during my commute, and having all kinds of rambly thoughts about how the stories/events/characters would look through other characters' eyes (I make my own fun! :P). I know you took a shot at writing from Jade's perspective and decided to stick with Moon's POV, but do you ever compose scenes from another POV for...whatever reason? Fun, or to think things through, or whatever?

No, not really. The POV controls so much about the scene, and the information that the reader is getting, I like to stick with the one I'm going to use in the final version. The reason for this in the Raksura books is that since Moon didn't grow up in Raksuran culture, his view and interpretation of it is very much affected by that. He misinterprets things, is wrong about things. That changes as the books go on, as he learns more and gets more comfortable. So to keep it straight in my head I really have to stick with his POV and not show alternate responses to scenes that he's in.

With other books that had more than on POV, I've occasionally had to re-write scenes where it felt like I'd tackled them from the wrong perspective.

* trobadora asked Which one of your books was the easiest to write? Do you know why?

City of Bones was a lot of fun to write and went fairly quickly. It was my second novel, first time to invent an alien species and have an alien main character (Khat), and since I wasn't basing it closely on any particular time and place, I felt a lot more free to just do whatever I wanted.

The Ships of Air was also a lot of fun, because it was my first sequel, and I just had a lot of fun with the whole with the whole concept. I had all the characters together on a giant ocean liner crossing an alien sea into danger, plus Tremaine Valiarde. I also got to start telling the readers how wrong the characters were about what they thought was happening in The Wizard Hunters.

Extra: one of the hardest was The Siren Depths, because of all the tricky emotional issues. Moon had built up a family and now I had to tear it apart and put it back together again, at least in his head, and that was not easy.


* There was also a question asked on tumblr about writing alien characters' gestures, body language, etc.


Remember the Book Fair

The annual Book Fair for Ballou SR High School is still going on. The school's library is badly underfunded, and while it's now in a new building, there is still no money for new books. At the link you can find the link to the school's Powell's wish list, and the direct address to the school librarian where you can ship the books:

Melissa Jackson, LIBRARIAN (be sure to include her title so the books go to the right place)
Ballou Senior High School
3401 Fourth Street SE
Washington DC 20032
(202) 645-3400

The list includes SF/F, graphic novels, mystery, YA, non-fiction, and pretty much everything. Most of the books on the list are under $20 and some are under $10.00. If you can't afford a book, please pass this info on.



Still Taking Questions

If anyone has a question, a general question about publishing (how it works, agents, etc), or a question about my writing, or my books, or cats, or anything else I've been doing, ask in this post and I'll try to answer it.

Raksura
marthawells

Art Talk, Links, Questions

Early this morning I got to see the second sketch by Matthew Stewart for the cover of Stories of the Raksura II: The Dead City & The Dark Earth Below (April 2015) and it is also gorgeous. I can't wait till we can finally show the finished version to people.

If you missed it, here's the final version of his cover for The Cloud Roads with two earlier versions on his site. (He won the Chesley Award for best paperback cover art in 2012 for it.)

In related news, there is a another GoodReads giveaway for Stories of the Raksura: The Falling World & The Tale of Indigo and Cloud

Couple of articles:

* We are all living among the dead by Annalee Newitz, on death and loss as we get older.

* The Guardian: Feminist games critic cancels talk after terror threat Anita Sarkeesian cancels talk at Utah State University over threats of 'the deadliest school shooting' in US history

Questions

And I haven't done this in a (long) while, but if anyone has a question, a general question about publishing (how it works, agents, etc), or a question about my writing, or my books, or cats, or anything else I've been doing, ask in this post and I'll try to answer it.

Stargate in Distance
marthawells

Book Fair, Book Recs, and Links

I've been waking up very early with anxiety issues this week, so basically ugh.


Book Fair

The annual Book Fair for Ballou SR High School has started. The school's library is badly underfunded, and while it's now in a new building, there is still no money for new books. At the link you can find the link to the school's Powell's wish list, and the direct address to the school librarian where you can ship the books, including SF/F, graphic novels, mystery, YA, non-fiction, and pretty much everything. Most of the books on the list are under $20 and some are under $10.00. If you can't afford a book, please pass this info on.

Book recs

* Fool's Gold: A Sabina Kane Novella by Jaye Wells

* The Black Ship by Diana Pharoah Francis
Thorn is a member of the Pilot's Guild—those who possess the magical ability to navigate Crosspointe's deadly seas. When a malevolent master within the Guild bans him from the sea, it seems his life is over. Then he is kidnapped and forced to serve aboard the rogue ship Eidolon—pitch black from bow to stern—and Thorn finds himself battling a mad captain, a mutinous crew, and the terrifying magic of the sea.

* The Time Roads by Beth Bernobich
A fantastical nineteenth century alternate historical steampunk romp from Beth Bernobich, the critically acclaimed author of the River of Souls trilogy.

Links

* Female Sci-Fi and Fantasy Authors Went Ignored for Far Too Long, and It's Time You Paid Attention by Marie Lu

* For a long list of women writers The List of Non-European Fantasy by Women

Teal'c and Sam
marthawells

Friday

Book recs:

* Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie, the sequel to Ancillary Justice is out. I loved the first one and have really been looking forward to this one.

* Poison Fruit by Jacqueline Carey
The hot-as-Hel series with the "Sookie Stackhouse type of vibe" (Paranormal Haven) is back—but this time the paranormal Midwestern town of Pemkowet is feeling a frost in the air and the residents are frozen in fear....

Links:

* J. Kathleen Cheney: So What’s an SF/F Archive All About? an interview with Jeremy Brett, the Curator of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Collection at Texas A&M University.

We believe that science fiction and fantasy are not only genres that are of intense and passionate interest to fans and other members of the general public, but also are of true cultural and literary significance and so deserve the same scholarly treatment that other literary and broadcast media genres receive. For that reason, we work to be a collection that appeals both to serious scholars and to interested laypeople, that welcomes all comers and has materials that will appeal to everyone. So we include novels, anthologies of short stories, nonfiction studies of SF and fantasy, magazines, manuscript collections, artifacts, and all kinds of fanworks (such as fanzines, filk and vids).

My Books

Stories of the Raksura vol. I is now officially released everywhere, in trade paperback, audiobook, and ebook.

I'm doing a signing Saturday November 8, 2014, at 1:00 pm for Stories of the Raksura Volume I and the paperback edition of Star Wars: Razor's Edge at Murder by the Book, in Houston, Texas.

If you can't be there, you can use this page to order a signed book from the store. They can also order The Cloud Roads, The Serpent Sea, and The Siren Depths from them to be signed and shipped to you also, so if you wanted a signed set of all the books, say as a Christmas or other winter holiday present, this would be a good time to do it.
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Stargate Atlantis
marthawells

Vacation

The last few days I took a short vacation to Galveston with my husband and friends. It's usually a really cheap trip for us, since it's only a few hours drive, we go in the off-season, we stay at an older condo building on the beach that rents out apartments for hotel rooms so you can share with several people and still be comfortable, etc. We had a good time, but there were some things that went wrong, mainly one friend had to cancel due to a death in the family, another had a bank transfer go wrong, then on the second to last day our car broke down and needed a new battery and a water pump. (The last went way better than it could have because the service department of the local Toyota dealership was extremely helpful and worked extra hard to get it fixed quickly so we didn't have to pay for an extra day or half-day at our hotel.) (It's a really good car, but it's nine years old and starting to feel its age.)

We did get to go swimming a few times, though the water was a little cool, and we did the harbor/dolphin boat tour and the dolphins started surfing in the wake of our boat.

Also, a huge storm came up on Monday afternoon. Half of it hit while we were in the rainforest exhibit pyramid at Moody Gardens. There are small openings at the top of the glass pyramid to let the rain in, so it actually rained while we were in the rainforest, so that was pretty cool. (It's a great exhibit anyway, designed so you start at the top and walk down through the canopy to the forest floor, and there are three different bat exhibits, one in a bat cave, and a giant leaf ant hive, and lots of other neat things.)

The rain backed off a bit and we went to go eat, but when we were sitting on an upper balcony at a place on the Sea Wall, another huge storm came up, so we moved inside. It cleared off very quickly, but we started to hear sirens on the way back, and when we got to our hotel, we started to see the beach emergency trucks driving up and down the beach, a rescue jet ski crossing back and forth in the waves, plus a search boat, and the coast guard helicopter flying low over the water. Yeah, not good signs. One of our friends had gone out for a walk on the beach when we got back, and she came in and said the emergency vehicles were all meeting up just down the beach from us at the end of the island where some fishing jetties are, and she had seen things like brand new unopened drink cans and pieces of a cooler washing ashore. We found out a small boat had wrecked and one person was unaccounted for. A little later they found him near the south jetty, not alive.

So it was kind of a stressful vacation, though it could have been a lot worse. (I got to see part of the moon eclipse because I was awake at 5:00 am stressing about the car!) Also very expensive, with the car problem, though that would have happened anyway at some point.
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Spacegate
marthawells

(no subject)

I have zero concentration going on today. Maybe after I get back from running errands, I can get something done. In the meantime:

Book rec:

* Girl on a Wire by Gwenda Bond
Sixteen-year-old Jules Maroni’s dream is to follow in her father’s footsteps as a high-wire walker. When her family is offered a prestigious role in the new Cirque American, it seems that Jules and the Amazing Maronis will finally get the spotlight they deserve. But the presence of the Flying Garcias may derail her plans. For decades, the two rival families have avoided each other as sworn enemies.

Jules ignores the drama and focuses on the wire, skyrocketing to fame as the girl in a red tutu who dances across the wire at death-defying heights. But when she discovers a peacock feather—an infamous object of bad luck—planted on her costume, Jules nearly loses her footing. She has no choice but to seek help from the unlikeliest of people: Remy Garcia, son of the Garcia clan matriarch and the best trapeze artist in the Cirque.

As more mysterious talismans believed to possess unlucky magic appear, Jules and Remy unite to find the culprit. And if they don’t figure out what’s going on soon, Jules may be the first Maroni to do the unthinkable: fall.

* Women Destroy Fantasy - Lightspeed Magazine Special Issue
Funded as a stretch goal of LIGHTSPEED's Women Destroy Science Fiction! Kickstarter campaign, this month we're presenting a special one-off issue and triumphant return of FANTASY! It's called Women Destroy Fantasy!, and it's all-fantasy extravaganza entirely written and edited by women. More stories will be available online throughout the month.

Some Links

* Discovery Is Becoming More And More Ridiculous With Its Fake Documentaries

* Magical Words: Beth Bernobich: Writing Advice, the Meta Post
First rule: There are no rules, only guidelines.
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