Stargate Monuments

marthawells

Martha Wells

The Invisible Woman


Stargate Monuments
marthawells

Guide Post

This is a brief introduction post for this journal.Collapse )

I also post at Tumblr, Twitter, and Dreamwidth.

SGA Hug
marthawells

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My fun for yesterday was that I chipped a front tooth. I have no idea how, I didn't eat any hard candy or anything else that might have done it. The tooth just spontaneously ejected a chip.

Couple of links:

Out of Print: Library Fundraiser for P.S. 244

I really like library or school-related fundraisers that involve buying books or equipment or donating to libraries, so if you know of any, feel free to point me to them.

Book View Cafe: Bad Attention I guess doing something like this is funny/clever to people who have never actually received death threats or other threats of bodily harm through the internet.

PSA: I have links to places where you can buy DRM-free ebooks of some of my novels here plus a lot of buy/preorder links for paperbacks, ebooks, and audiobooks here.

And my links to information sites for beginning writers is here.

SGA Maps
marthawells

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Where it was this weekend (photo on Tumblr): http://marthawells.tumblr.com/post/82682349287/what-i-did-this-weekend


Couple of links:

Murder is Everywhere: What Not to Say to a Writer
It is a bit of a peculiar occupation for those not involved in it to grasp, I admit, and I've often discovered that when people don't understand what you do, they are—unintentionally, I'm sure—incredibly rude about it. Now, don't get me wrong. These were otherwise terribly nice people, but after a while I started to play Writer's Insult Bingo, and very nearly scored a Full House.

NYT: The Ballad of Geeshie and Elvie
This is a long, fascinating article, about music historians researching African American music of the 1930s, when so many of the records have been lost or destroyed, when so many of the people who were there have passed away, when so many of the interviews and information and photos they provided is locked in an archive no one is allowed to see. It has music and some interviews included, so if you're at work, turn your sound down.

There are musicians as obscure as Wiley and Thomas, and musicians as great, but in none does the Venn diagram of greatness and lostness reveal such vast and bewildering co-extent. In the spring of 1930, in a damp and dimly lit studio, in a small Wisconsin village on the western shore of Lake Michigan, the duo recorded a batch of songs that for more than half a century have been numbered among the masterpieces of prewar American music, in particular two, Elvie's "Motherless Child Blues" and Geeshie's "Last Kind Words Blues," twin Alps of their tiny oeuvre, inspiring essays and novels and films and cover versions, a classical arrangement.

John Green Tree
marthawells

(no subject)

Book recs:

* Attack the Geek by Michael R. Underwood
A side-quest novella in the bestselling Geekomancy urban fantasy series—when D&D-style adventures go from the tabletop to real life, look out!

* The Churn an expanse novella by James S.A. Corey

* Horizon by Jenn Reese
A fitting finale for a gripping futurist series whose four multifaceted heroes offer a strong anti-war, pro-diversity message. —Kirkus Reviews

Links

* Daily Dot: Every Review of Black Widow in Captain America is Wrong

* Cynsations: Guest Post: Joseph Bruchac on "You Don't Look Indian."
Tags:

Dr. Orpheus
marthawells

Kobold Guide to Magic

I have a non-fiction piece out today in The Kobold Guide to Magic. It's called "A Life Less Ordinary: The Environment, Magic Systems, and Non-Humans" and it's about world-building for non-human species with magic.

Here's the description of the anthology: The Kobold Guide to Magic takes you behind the scenes to learn the secrets of designing and writing about magic from 20 top fantasy authors and game designers. Find out how to create more compelling, more interesting, and more playable magic at your table or in your stories—with the word from some of the most talented creators working today.

It's available as a PDF and as a paperback: Kobold Press, Amazon, Paizo, DriveThruRPG

***

I had the first weekend in a while where I spent the whole time at home. I worked on the last Raksura novella, watched Miss Marple and Archer, and that was about it. We also got a good amount of rain on Saturday, which was a relief. I'm hoping for no more dead trees, at least for this year. I still need to figure out what to do about the three dead trees we already have.

ETA: Oh, and I wanted to mention for people in town, there are still a few copies of Emilie and the Sky World at the local Barnes and Noble (not the one on campus).

The Cloud Roads
marthawells

(no subject)

We're waiting to go see Winter Soldier on Tuesday, so mostly what I'm doing this weekend is avoiding spoilers and trying to finish the last Raksura novella.

links:

* Whatever: The Big Idea article by Emily Jiang for her book Summoning the Phoenix.

* Beth Cato talks about her upcoming book The Clockwork Dagger

* N.K. Jemisin: Confirmation bias, epic fantasy, and you

* SF Signal: Catherine Lundoff on LGBT Science Fiction and Fantasy in the 1980s

* There's a new original Star Trek fan film series Star Trek Continues. I haven't tried it yet, though I have really enjoyed the ones here by Star Trek Phase 2

ETA: Fantasy Book Cafe: Women in SF&F Month: Beth Bernobich - The Invisible Woman
Over and over, I hear that women don't write the genre, they don't read the genre, and they certainly can't be the main character, unless it's urban fantasy, and that's really romance, so naturally that doesn't count. And inevitably the conversation drifts back to the men who write genre, and the guys they write about.

Joanna Russ described the situation in her book, How to Suppress Women's Writing. "She didn't write it." (Mary Shelley) "She wrote it, but she's an anomaly." (Butler, Le Guin, Tiptree) "She wrote it but look what she wrote about." (Urban fantasy written by women.)

SGA Hug
marthawells

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I was supposed to have jury duty today, and it was cancelled! Yay! I'm still working on the last Raksura novella today, which still doesn't have a title, and I need to do things like house cleaning and continuing to dig up the back yard.

I talked about this last weekend, but keep forgetting to link it: I have a section for Links to Information Sites for Beginning Writers on my web site.

Some Book recs:

* The Burning Dark by Adam Christopher.
I got to read this as an ARC and really liked it. It's a dark SF novel, with the characters trapped on a creepy space station that is being slowly decommissioned and dismantled, while increasingly strange things happen. It's not horror, but if you like SF mysteries and you like haunted house novels, this is for you.

* Delightfully Twisted Tales:The Worst of Both Worlds (Volume Eight) by Nicky Draden.
Maintenance workers tend to a living ship with mental issues, a tentacled alien competes in her first triathlon on Earth, a man goes to the ends of the Earth and beyond for the perfect anniversary present, and a horny translator hopes to put the "contact" in an impending first contact. This delightfully twisted collection of four short stories is easily devoured in one sitting and will leave you hungry for more.

* Perfect Pitch by Mindy Klasky
Reigning beauty queen Samantha Winger is launching her pet project, a music program for kids. All she has to do is follow the pageant's rules—no smoking, drinking, or "cavorting" in public.

* The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison (Sarah Monette)
The youngest, half-goblin son of the Emperor has lived his entire life in exile, distant from the Imperial Court and the deadly intrigue that suffuses it. But when his father and three sons in line for the throne are killed in an "accident," he has no choice but to take his place as the only surviving rightful heir.

Some Links:

* Teaching Tolerance publishes guide for teaching the civil rights movement This is designed for teachers and is free to download as a PDF.

* Recommend SF/F Books by Women
We’ve built a list containing a multitude of women’s voices and we hope everyone enjoys it. But we’re not done yet. Again this year, we want you to come share ten science fiction and fantasy books by women writers that you love with us until the end of April. They can be all new books, released since we did this last. They can be older titles. They can be a mixture of old and new. They can be books already on the list, or books not yet represented, as long as you love them. Visit the Recommend Books page to search for up to ten science fiction and fantasy books by women and submit them.

Books by me:

I also have some new books out/coming out, including Emilie and the Sky World (which if you've read it already, putting reviews on Amazons or B&N or GoodReads would be really great, but only if you want to, no pressure), Stories of the Raksura: Volume I which includes the first two novellas, one short and one long, and will be out in September, and the paperback version of Star Wars: Razor's Edge, which will be out in October. You can see buy links here on my web site, or I have a separate list of DRM-free ebooks here, some of which are pretty cheap.

Stargate Pyramid
marthawells

LeoCon

This weekend I was a guest of honor at LeoCon, a small one-day convention at Texas A&M University at Commerce. It's only their third year, but it was a great convention. It's run and organized by a student committee, and sponsored by the university, and it had a young, diverse crowd interested in books, anime, comics, TV and movies, and lots of people in costume. (It reminded me a lot of what AggieCon used to be like when I was a student.)

It's organized a bit like an academic conference, with some SF-related academic presentations. I did a reading (from the third Raksura short novella, "The Dead City") and did a drawing to give away some free books, and did a Q and A session on publishing in general. I also sat in on the digital publishing panel in the afternoon. Artist Bryan Brinlee was also a guest and did a presentation on how to do comic pages, and Nathan Arbuckle, a technical director and visual effects artist, showed his demo reel from some of the movies he'd worked on (The Avengers, Thor: The Dark World, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, etc). And at the end of the day (before the costume contest and dance) there was a raffle drawing for a bunch of prizes.

I had an awesome time.

Also if you live nearby, the university literary journal, The Mayo Review, is going to be having a launch party on April 18th with author Pat Carr, with a workshop and reading.

Here's some pictures from the convention: (taken with a phone, so not that great)

LeoConphoto1

LeoConphoto5

LeoConphoto4

LeoConphoto3

LeoConphoto2

Stargate Monuments
marthawells

(no subject)

So, this happened: Galveston Oil Spill This story talks a little bit, at the very end, about the effect on the local fishing and tourist economy, and the wildlife. This is going to be devastating.

This was a bad to terrible weekend for a lot of people, and it's depressing, and I'm probably not going to be very communicative. But below is the post I was going to make today before all this:

***

The SCBWI workshop went really well yesterday. The first hour we talked about the history of SF/F, how early SF elements begin to show up in recorded literature (like The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter), early tropes like hollow earth, lost world, etc, and then we talked about modern day categories and how they've changed over the years. The second hour was about worldbuilding in particular, and the worldbuilding exercise went especially well. We built an original alien fantasy world and sketched out its culture (with a few possible variations) within about ten minutes. (It goes fast with ten people brainstorming on it.) (When I asked everyone to each name a physical characteristic for our alien species, and the first person said "A tail with a poison-barb tip" I knew we were going to do great.)

The exercise is to basically take three points 1) climate/environment 2) culture (including material culture) and 3) physical form/attributes (it's more fun when you don't use humans). You choose a climate and an environment, then everyone picks attributes for your species, then you come up with the culture by seeing how those attributes would affect their interaction with the climate/environment, and what they would need to have/do to survive, thrive, etc. Then you add a fourth element, magic, and see how that would add to or alter things.

Next weekend, I'll be at LeoCon at TAMU-Commerce.

Journey - Young Hercules
marthawells

(no subject)

This Saturday I'll be here: Martha Wells on Writing Speculative Fiction for Kids and Teens

Weekend after this I'll be at: LeoCon at TAMU-Commerce.


Links for the weekend:

Juliet E. McKenna: Where do our ideas go? Creativity inspired by SF&F writing art inspired by SF/F novels -- check out the Fauxtography website she links to, it's pretty cool.

J. Kathleen Cheney: Urban Centers Film of different cities, from 1901-1911.

Cracked: 5 Shocking Realities of Being Transgender the Media Ignores

Atlas Obscura: Before the Garden Gnome, the Ornamental Hermit: A Real Person Paid to Dress like a Druid

New York Review of Books: Elegy for a Country’s Seasons