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marthawells

Martha Wells

My Flying Lizard Circus


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marthawells

Answering Questions

First off, yukinakid wrote I was wondering if Cloud Roads is a stand alone or if there will be a series. =)

Yes, there's a second book, The Serpent Sea, which should be out from Night Shade next year. It starts a short while after The Cloud Roads ends. I don't know the exact release date yet, but I'll post it when I do. And I'm working on a third book, but the publisher hasn't bought it yet.


daisan asked In light of the post you linked to a few days ago (fantasy genres) what is your advice to someone who wants to write epic fantasy? Since it's unlikely to be published, are we just wasting our time?

Epic fantasy is harder to publish right now (everything is harder to publish) but I don't think it's dying out. Epic fantasy has been popular for a long time, and with the Game of Thrones TV series and The Hobbit in production, it's not going out of style anytime soon. And writing something (like urban fantasy or paranormal romance) just because it's popular, can really backfire on you if the market changes before you finish the book. Or if you're writing something you don't care for just because you think it will be more likely to sell.

(And one thing that is changing the market is the popularity of YA fiction. As pointed out in the #yasaves discussion, YA is an age range, not a genre, and it encompasses every genre out there, including epic fantasy.)

The big thing is, you have to write what you really want to write, or there's no point in doing it. There are a lot of vanity press places that paint writing as a get rich quick scheme, and it isn't. I could make more money as the assistant manager of a McDonald's than I am as a professional writer right now, and I wouldn't face nearly as much rejection, bad reviews, and people telling me I suck.

Committing your time and energy to writing any kind of book is a risk. There are always a few people who beat the curve and become bestsellers or self-published kindle millionaires, but those are very few compared to the hundreds and hundreds of people who write professionally. So the only point in doing this is because you love it, and writing what you want to write, what you feel called upon to write, is part of that. And if you are happy with what you're writing, you aren't wasting your time, even if it never sells.


sorka42 also asked a question, but I'm going to answer that one tomorrow. I've got my first physical therapy appointment this morning so I'm a bit short on time.

Still taking writing questions on this post.

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The big thing is, you have to write what you really want to write, or there's no point in doing it.

This. If you are writing something that you feel will reach readers and it doesn't actually reach *you*, it seems like a recipe for failure. And no fun.

There were probably writers who were certain they could sell "Soviet Union invades US" novels for the rest of their lives. Sometimes it's REALLY hard to know what the market will be like.

"YA is an age range, not a genre, and it encompasses every genre out there, including epic fantasy."

Christopher Paolini comes to mind.

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