Martha Wells (marthawells) wrote,
Martha Wells
marthawells

Money, Marbles, and Chalk by Holland Taylor

We went down to Galveston over the past couple of days, and had a great time.

One thing we did was see the premiere of Holland Taylor's one woman play "Money, Marbles, and Chalk," about the life of Ann Richards. It was excellent, and as an Ann Richards fan, it was fabulous. The title is an old blues expression, meaning "I'm all in, everything I've got."

The play talks about Richards' childhood, her parents, and the governorship. The best scenes were set in Richards' office, with the voices of her staff members playing themselves, while she wrestles with a death penalty case, rips the heads off various subordinates, harasses Bill Clinton on the phone, organizes a fishing trip with her four children, and plans to buy boots for the subordinates whose heads she's ripping off. It's funny and touching, and Holland Taylor made me cry a couple of times. You come out of it really wishing Richards had survived to kick even more ass.

She talks about going to the Lady Longhorns basketball games with Barbara Jordan, and how Jordan would pull her wheelchair up to the scoring table, and if things weren't going well she would pound on it and shout in the voice of God, "Can we not shoot any better than that?" (Somebody should do a one-woman show about Barbara Jordan and have it somewhere where I can go see it.)

The play was only at the Grand Opera House this weekend, but hopefully it'll be traveling all over. More people need to see this.

And this was our first time to go to the Opera House, which was built in 1894, and is gorgeous on the inside. The play didn't end until after 11:00, and by that point it was pouring down rain. Pouring. With flood warnings and everything. We ended up wading through foot-deep water to get to the car, but managed to get back without drowning or being swept off the Seawall or anything, so that turned out all right.
Tags: ann richards, barbara jordan, galveston, holland taylor
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