Stargate Monuments

marthawells

Martha Wells

My Flying Lizard Circus


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Stargate Monuments
marthawells

Book Recs

Great review this morning of the Books of the Raksura: Sky's the Limit

A fantasy story about a human culture dominated by a from-birth caste system, ruled by physically strong women who take beautiful, docile male consorts – a culture that lacks a concept of marriage, where all children are raised collectively and which has no taboos against either polyamory or queer relationships, and where both are treated as normative – would instantly read as blasphemous to some or utopian to others; but either way, we’d likely interpret such narrative choices as being overtly political. But because the Raksura are demonstrably a different species to us – and because, just as importantly, their culture isn't presented as secondary to, exoticised by or in direct contrast with a more "normal" human society – it’s much, much easier to accept these elements of the story at face value: as things that just are, instead of things that need to be constantly questioned or remarked upon.

The art pictured is by Matthew Stewart, who won a Chesley Award for the cover of The Cloud Roads.

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Book recs

* In Midnight's Silence by T. Frohock
1930's Spain is the backdrop for the tale of supernatural beings, a dark bargain, and a struggle for autonomy, fatherhood, love, and perhaps the future of the world.

* Shades in Shadow: An Inheritance Triptych by N.K. Jemisin
Three brand new short stories by Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy Award nominated author N.K. Jemisin, set in the world of the Inheritance trilogy.

* Legenda Maris by Tanith Lee
Legenda Maris comprises eleven tales of the ocean and her denizens, including two that are original to this collection – ‘Leviathan’ and ‘Land’s End, The Edge of The Sea’ – which were among the last stories Tanith Lee wrote. In this treasure chest of tales, the author works her beguiling, linguistic sorcery to conjure mermaids who are as deadly as they are lovely, the hidden coves of lonely fishing villages harbouring mysteries, and fantastical ships that haunt the waves. She explores the relationship between the sea and the land, and the occasional meetings between those who dwell above and below the waters – meetings that are sometimes wondrous and sometimes fatal, often both.

* Our Lady of the Ice by Cassandra Rose Clarke (up for preorder)
The Yiddish Policeman’s Union meets The Windup Girl when a female PI goes up against a ruthless gangster—just as both humans and robots agitate for independence in an Argentinian colony in Antarctica.

* Bone Swans by C.S.E. Cooney
Fabulous story collection: A swan princess hunted for her bones, a broken musician and his silver pipe, and a rat named Maurice bring justice to a town under fell enchantment. A gang of courageous kids confronts both a plague-destroyed world and an afterlife infested with clowns but robbed of laughter. In an island city, the murder of a child unites two lovers, but vengeance will part them. Only human sacrifice will save a city trapped in ice and darkness. Gold spun out of straw has a price, but not the one you expect.

* The House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Bodard (up for preorder)
Multi-award winning author Aliette de Bodard, brings her story of the War in Heaven to Paris, igniting the City of Light in a fantasy of divine power and deep conspiracy...

* Court of Fives by Kate Elliott (up for preorder)
In this imaginative escape into an enthralling new world, World Fantasy Award finalist Kate Elliott's first young adult novel weaves an epic story of a girl struggling to do what she loves in a society suffocated by rules of class and privilege.

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Yes, Stone and Moon are the very model of docility.

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